Thank God for teachers.


Just as we need teachers to help little ones grasp school lessons, so too do we need persons to help the weaker, the less experienced and not-so-sure-footed believers when it comes to matters of faith.
This has been going on for generations, with good effect. The ancient Hebrews were told to teach their children matters of faith. “Keep these words that I am commanding you today in your heart. Recite them to your children and talk about them when you are at home and when you are away, when you lie down, and when you rise…” (Deuteronomy 6:6-7and 11:19).

Paul stayed with the people at Corinth for a year and six months building them up by teaching lessons in the faith. He did the same in Antioch where he was invited to stay on, but declined. From there he went “from place to place through the region of Galatia and Phrygia, strengthening all the disciples” (18:23). They needed to be built up, and not remain like the “bare rock” in the Parable of the Sower. Bare soil is not a good receptor for God’s word as it has no depth of preparation through teaching or otherwise.
Foundations are built through the loving hard work of teachers. Yes, a readiness to learn is important, but not everyone is self-motivated to achieve learning unaided, even though the Holy Spirit makes us wise. That in itself is a process.
To progress through that process, we need to be willing to learn, even the teachers among us, so that we all make progress. Small wonder Jesus said that we should be as children because we do need that humility to accept teaching that we need.
About teaching and learning, there was also Apollos who though “eloquent and well-versed in the scriptures” learnt from Priscilla and Aquilla, an experience that prepared him to teach those in Achaia with the result that “he greatly helped those who through grace had become believers.”

O teach me, Lord, that I may teach
The precious things thou dost impart;
and wing my words that they may reach
the hidden depths of many a heart.

Frances Ridley Havergal, 1836-79

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